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About

About Me

I am currently reading for a DPhil in English at University of Oxford. I’m in Wadham College, but before that I completed the University of Leicester MA in Modern Literature in 2010 and a BA in English at Leicester in 2009. I grew up in Bangor, Northern Ireland. I am also Director of PoetCasting – a nationwide poetry podcasting project, and I write poetry myself.

If you want to find out more about me, I have my own website at www.alexpryce.com.

Users of academia.edu can follow me there at http://oxford.academia.edu/AlexPryce. I’m happy to receive emails too at poetcasting[remove-antispamtext]@hotmail.co.uk.

 

About My Thesis

My research looks at three Northern Irish poets who emerged in the mid-1990s; Colette Bryce, Leontia Flynn and Sinéad Morrisey. I’m investigating how they respond to and are situated within and against a tradition that is predominantly male.

Colette Bryce was born in Derry in 1970 and has lived in England since she was 18. Her collections include The Heel of Bernadette (2000), The Full Indian Rope Trick (2004) and Self-Portrait in the Dark (2008). Her work explores the nature of identity and love, and often explores a tense relationship with Northern Ireland.

Sinéad Morrissey was born in 1972 in Portadown and has published four collections; There Was Fire in Vancouver (1996), Between Here and There (2002), The State of the Prisons (2005) and Through the Square Window (2009). Her work often interrogates the spaces between two things, and is as influenced by Northern Ireland as it is by other lands and cultures.

Leontia Flynn was born in County Down 1974 and has completed a PhD on the Northern Irish poet Medbh McGuckian. Her collections are These Days (2004) and Drives (2008). Her poetry is witty, funny, sharply contemporary and often interested in the psychological aspects of the self.

 

About My Work

For many years I’ve worked to increase engagement in the Arts through social media, podcasting and website development.

Header image by Marc Wathieu (Flickr). CC 2.0